One-of-a-Kind Water Towers From Around the Globe

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In our world today, there are fewer precious commodities than clean water – and lots of it comes from whacky water towers like these! Here are 10 one-of-a-kind tower creations you can discover around the globe:

1. Brooks Catsup Bottle – Illinois, US

Brooks Catsup Bottle – Illinois, US

If you’re ever driving down Route 159, you’ll have the pleasure of spotting the world’s largest Catsup (ketchup) bottle. Constructed in 1949, it is just over 50 metres tall and is the centre of the Annual Brooks World’s Largest Catsup Bottle Festival, which is held in July every year.


2. Eindhoven Water Towers – Eindhoven, Netherlands

Eindhoven Water Towers – Eindhoven, Netherlands

These space-like spherical creations have been supplying water to the town of Eindhoven since 1970. Each is 10 metres in diameter and together, they create the Netherlands’ biggest water tower.


3. Stained Glass Water Tower – New York, US

Stained Glass Water Tower – New York, US

It might not actually contain water, but this water tower sculpture is a beautiful sight to behold. Located in Dumbo, Brooklyn, the tower sits on the top of the building at 20 Jay Street and is made of plexiglass and steel. It also lights up at night to create a breathtakingly colourful effect!


4. House in the Clouds – Thorpeness, UK

House in the Clouds – Thorpeness, UK

In the eastern region of Suffolk, this wonderful structure was once a water tower that served the town from 1923 to 1977. Today, it has been converted into an actual house that is available for holiday bookings. A single night stay will cost around £525.


5. Old Water Tower – Landskrona, Sweden

Old Water Tower – Landskrona, Sweden

There is much history surrounding the medieval town of Landskrona. Although it was established in the 15th century, it wasn’t until the early 1900s that this castle-esque water tower was designed and built. Today, it’s a key landmark of the town and is visible from afar.


6. Corncob Water Tower – Rochester, US

Corncob Water Tower – Rochester, US

This giant corncob in the sky can be found at the Seneca Food Plant and Cannery in Minnesota. It embodies the town’s rich history with agriculture and has been there since 1931. There are rumours, however, that it may be removed at some point as naughty kids keep trying to climb it late at night!


7. Kuwait Water Towers – Kuwait City, Kuwait

Kuwait Water Towers – Kuwait City, Kuwait

With 31 towers all up, it’s easy to see why these striped mushroom beauties have become a famed landmark in Kuwait City. These towers were commissioned in 1965 and shouldn’t be confused with the three 1979 Kuwait Towers, which are also water towers but have a more modern feel. Which do you like more?


8. Coffee Pot Water Tower – Stanton, US

Coffee Pot Water Tower – Stanton, US

Can’t survive without your morning cuppa? Just head to the town of Stanton, Iowa, and you’ll discover this huge coffee-themed water tower, which was built in 1921. Stanton apparently has its roots in Scandinavian coffee making, and actress Virginia Christine, who became the spokesperson for Folger’s Coffee, was born here.

Unfortunately, the tower is no longer, but the pot still stands on ground level and is a popular tourist attraction.


9. Warka Water Tower – Ethiopia

Warka Water Tower – Ethiopia

Water can be scarce in Ethiopia. Thankfully, this pineapple-shaped water tower, which comes from Italian company Architecture and Vision, was designed to produce water out of thin air.

Made from biodegradable bamboo and polyester mesh, the structure collects air and gathers the moisture from it to produce around 25 gallons of water per day. It even works in the desert. Amazing!


10. Kizu Minami Water Tower – Kizu, Japan

Kizu Minami Water Tower – Kizu, Japan

If you plan to holiday in Kyoto, a quick jaunt in Kizu to see this water tower could be a grand idea! It might look like it based on the design of a medieval fort, but it was actually inspired by the natural shape and design of bamboo stems. It was built in 1999 and brings water to around 16,000 people.

Photo credits: mrsdkrebs, Stlsnowleopard, Lempkesfabriek, catchesthelight, Oxyman, Väsk, Jonathunder, lexrex, auvet, ian_e_abbott, carlotaz (Pinterest)